News

The 2010 Wildlands and Woodlands report brought attention to the fact that New England had begun to lose forested land on a net annual basis, threatening the clean air and water, and natural habitats that sustain us all.
From our magnificent stretches of forests to our fertile, rolling farmlands, the story of New England is inseparable from the story of the land. For centuries, New Englanders have been deeply reliant on the natural landscape to sustain us.
In a September 2014 article in Smithsonian Magazine titled “Can the World Really Set Aside Half of the Planet for Wildlife?” author Tony Hiss highlights the success of New England conservation, including the Wildlands and Woodlands vision and associated Regional Conservation Partnership (
The Practitioners’ Network for Large Landscape Conservation is holding a major conference on large landscape conservation October 23 – 24, 2014 in Washington, DC. The two-day event will focus on knowledge-building and knowledge-sharing to address the challenges and opportunities of the future of large landscape conservation. 
The New England Forestry Foundation (NEFF) released New England Forests: The Path to Sustainability June 5th to address 12 major benefits of conserving forests across New England.
In a testimony given in May to a Senate Appropriations Subcommittee, 87 conservation, forestry, and recreation organizations urged lawmakers to invest in the health of New England’s forests.
The importance of working across state and town lines to identify land conservation opportunities was highlighted by Bob Eckenrode, president of Newtown Forest Association, in a presentation on the Fairfield County Regional Conservation Partnership (FCRCP) at the Connecticut Land Conservation Conference March 15.
The Changes to the Land report, led by W&W partner, Harvard Forest, is featured in the current issue of Saving Land magazine, a publication put out by the Land Trust Alliance.
The President’s Budget for FY 2015 was released March 4 with excellent news for conservation – full funding for the Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), which has funded critical land and water conservation projects for the past 50 years in New England and across the country.  The LWCF has been chronically shortchanged by Congressional budgets even though the program is authorized at $900 million per year from offshore oil and gas drilling revenues, not

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